SNAP – Local #66 Employee Notice of Changes to the DOT Drug-Testing Panel

Employee Notice of Changes to the DOT Drug-Testing Panel:

The Sheet Metal Workers’ Local 66 Drug Free Workplace Drug testing program will adhere to DOT testing standards that includes: four semi-synthetic opioids (i.e., hydrocodone, oxycodone, hydromorphone and oxymorphone). The changes to the DOT panel test occurred several months ago and in order for our SNAP test to continue to be recognized by the area General Contractors, we need to update our panel to match what is going on industry-wide, and also to stay in compliance with our own standards. Failure to make this change would result in our Members submitting to whatever Drug Testing Program that the General Contractors administer, some of which carry a lifetime ban on their projects. We wish to have our Local 66 Members test under our own Program.

What does this mean for EMPLOYEES?

In addition to the existing drug-testing panel (that includes marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, phencyclidine (PCP), and opiates), you will also be tested for four semi-synthetic opioids (i.e., hydrocodone, oxycodone, hydromorphone and oxymorphone).  Some common names for these semi-synthetic opioids include OxyContin®, Percodan®, Percocet®, Vicodin®, Lortab®, Norco®, Dilaudid®, Exalgo®.

If you test positive for any of the semi-synthetic opioid drugs, then as with any other drug test result that is confirmed by the laboratory, the Medical Review Officer (MRO) will conduct an interview with you to determine if there is a legitimate medical explanation for the result.  If you have a valid prescription, you should provide it to the MRO, who will determine if the prescription is valid.  If a legitimate medical explanation is established, the MRO will report the result to your employer as a ‘negative’.  If not, the MRO will report the result to your employer as ‘positive’.

As it has been the requirement in the past, when your employer receives a “positive” drug test result, your employer is to immediately refer you to the EAP.

Do I need to tell anyone about my prescribed medications?

Your employer may have a policy that requires you to report your prescribed medications to them.  So check with your employer.  If your job function has DOT-regulated medical standards (truck/bus driver, airline pilot, mariner), the DOT agency regulation may require you to report your prescribed medications to those who approved your medical qualifications.

What should I tell my prescribing physician?

If you are taking any prescription medications, consider this to be a reminder to have a conversation with your prescribing physician to discuss your safety-sensitive work.  Be proactive in ensuring that your prescribing physician knows what type of transportation-related safety-sensitive work you currently perform.  For example, don’t just provide a job title but describe your exact job function(s) or ask your employer for a detailed description of your job function that you can give to your prescribing physician. 

This is important information for your prescribing physician to consider when deciding whether and what medication to prescribe for you.  It is important for you to know whether your medications could impact your ability to safely perform your transportation-related work.        

Will the MRO report my prescribed medication use/info to a third party?

Historically, the DOT’s regulation required the MRO to report your medication use/medical information to a third party (e.g. your employer, health care provider responsible for your medical qualifications, etc.), if the MRO determines in his/her reasonable medical judgement that you may be medically unqualified according to DOT Agency regulations, or if your continued performance is likely to pose a significant safety risk.  The MRO may report this information even if the MRO verifies your drug test result as ‘negative’.

As of January 1, 2018, prior to the MRO reporting your information to a third party you will have up to five days to have your prescribing physician contact the MRO.  You are responsible for facilitating the contact between the MRO and your prescribing physician.  Your prescribing physician should be willing to state to the MRO that you can safely perform your safety-sensitive functions while taking the medication(s), or consider changing your medication to one that does not make you medically unqualified or does not pose a significant safety risk.

NOTE:   This document informally summarizes some of the effects of recent changes to the Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs that are important for transportation employees, but it should not be relied upon to determine legal compliance with those procedures.

June 4, 2018